Divorce – What About the Children?

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A divorce is often a tough time in a person’s life. Emotions are scattered, and it’s difficult to make any firm decisions about the future. Some of these life-changing choices can be put off, but when it comes to the children, there are no delaying decisions regarding their well-being. 

It’s critical to remember that the decisions you make now will impact the rest of your children’s lives. You need to be practical and think sensibly before casting anything in stone. Family law practitioners at ClearWay Law believe that it helps to have an outsider to act as a mediator. 

When you have an external opinion that’s unbiased, it can help you to stay away from making emotional decisions. The most crucial factor is that you keep the best interests of the children in mind at all times. 

Communication Is Key

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Depending on the ages of the minors, take the time to talk to them, so they aren’t confused. Children are resilient, but this time can also be a scary time for them. You should take care to explain that your divorce has nothing to do with them and that both parents love them very much.

Young children need to feel safe and loved. Listen to what your children are saying and try to explain what’s happening as best as possible. Older children can tolerate a lot more information than younger siblings, but you know your kids, so it’s best to use your judgment here. 

Don’t discuss any tentative plans about custody or living arrangements until this has been finalized. If you aren’t yet sure of the plans going forward, then you’ll only create more uncertainty in your kid’s minds.

When you and your spouse have agreed to what’s best for the children, then sit them down and share what you have mapped out.

What Is the Best Parenting Plan?

There’s never a one-size-fits-all solution. Your spouse may spend a lot of time traveling for work. If this is the case, then living arrangements need to be planned around this. If your children have lots of extra-curricular activities, you need to decide who can accommodate driving them around best.

There are so many factors to consider, and it takes time to find the perfect fit. Often, a mediator will help you to put a plan in place and suggest doing a trial run for a few weeks. This way, you can decide if it works well or if some changes need to be made. 

Stay open and flexible to changes; keep in mind that you’re trying to find a solution that works for everyone. 

Conclusion

Remember that your situation is unique. You can’t try to replicate what someone else has done and expect it to work. Find a solution that works for you and your family. Don’t be afraid to enlist the help of a professional, because an outsider’s support can be your greatest asset at this time.